David Rogers’ Big Bugs larger-than-life sculptures coming to the San Antonio Botanical Garden

Exhibition opens Labor Day weekend (Aug. 31 – Sept. 1) through Dec. 8.
Exhibit viewing times 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

  • Saturday, Aug. 31 | 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. | Educational Children’s Activities: Children will have an opportunity to participate in an educational scavenger hunt and make insects using natural materials.
  • Saturday, Aug. 31 – Sunday, Sept. 1 | 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. | Social Bingo and Prizes!: Take photos with 5 David Rogers’ Big Bugs and show them at the Gift Shop for a prize. Offer only valid during opening weekend, while supplies last. Use #DavidRogersBigBugs and #SABOTgarden.
  • Saturday, Aug. 31 – Tuesday, Dec. 8 | 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. | Bug Merchandise and More – Shop for bug merchandise and edible insects at the Garden Gift Shop.

Regular admission rates apply.

They’re big, really big. David Rogers’ Big Bugs stand as tall as 25 feet and have wingspans up to 17 feet wide, and they are coming to the San Antonio Botanical Garden. David Rogers’ Big Bugs exhibition will be on display from Saturday, Aug. 31, through Sunday, Dec. 8.

David Rogers’ Big Bugs exhibit includes 10 larger-than-life insect sculptures, all made from natural materials, positioned throughout the 38 acres of the Botanical Garden. The sculptures are created using various combinations of whole trees found standing or fallen dead, cut green saplings selectively harvested from the willow family, dry branches, and other forest materials.

About David Rogers’ Big Bugs

For the past 25 years, David Rogers’ Big Bugs exhibition has educated the public about the importance of preservation and conservation on the planet by introducing them to the world of insects, the role they play in the plant world, and their interconnectedness to our lives. Bugs outnumber humans one million to one. Many live in communal groups working as one for the common good of all. Their ranks include engineers, soldiers, weightlifters, weavers, hunters, stalkers, gatherers, and even royalty. When you take this remarkable and diverse group of hidden gardeners and recreate them on a gargantuan scale, you have David Rogers’ Big Bugs.

About the Artist

The artist was not a traditional learner. He was not good in school or sports like his siblings. Instead, David found peace in the woods near his home.  As he focused on his artwork, he understood it came from “not fitting a mold.” And it became something much bigger! His art now teaches others about the importance of caring for our natural world. David also finds that his personal story connects with other non-traditional learners.  “I feel fortunate in my life that I found something that I love to do.”

This exhibit is made possible by the generosity of these sponsors:

Dickson-Allen Foundation

Gretchen Swanson Family Foundation

Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. and Helen C. Kleberg Foundation

The USAA Foundation.